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Book Groups

 

Book Ends : Philosophy Book Discussion Group

A bi-monthly book group dedicated to the great philosophers of our time and their works.  Moderator, Robert Brantl Esq; leads the group covering philosophical ideas found in essays, the classics to recently published works.  Each topic is studied over a lengthy period lasting several months.  Members are required to obtain copies of discussion material. 

March - May 2019

Title:  An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding by, David Hume

 pdf copy is available online to download for free.  A copy of the Project Gutenberg ebook is also available.

 A hard copy of the book is available for extended checkout at the circulation desk.

Hume, (born May 7 [April 26, Old Style], 1711, Edinburgh, Scotland—died August 25, 1776, Edinburgh), Scottish philosopher, historian, economist, and essayist known especially for his philosophical empiricism and skepticism.  

An Enquiry Concerning Human Understandingis an attempt to define the principles of human knowledge. It poses in logical form significant questions about the nature of reasoning in regard to matters of fact and experience, and it answers them by recourse to the principle of association. The basis of Hume’s exposition is a twofold classification of objects of awareness. In the first place, all such objects are either “impressions,” data of sensation or of internal consciousness, or “ideas,” derived from such data by compounding, transposing, augmenting, or diminishing. In the second place, there are two approaches to construing meaning: an analytical one, which concentrates on the “relations of ideas,” and an empirical one, which focuses on “matters of fact.” - Britannica .com

 

Date:  June 2019  

Title:  Prolegomena To Any Future Metaphysics  by, Immanuel Kant

A pdf of this book is available online.  From Wikipedia: published in 1783, two years after the first edition of his Critique of Pure Reason. One of Kant's shorter works, it contains a summary of the Critique‘s main conclusions, sometimes by arguments Kant had not used in the Critique. Kant characterizes his more accessible approach here as an "analytic" one, as opposed to the Critique‘s "synthetic" examination of successive faculties of the mind and their principles. The book is also intended as a polemic. Kant was disappointed by the poor reception of the Critique of Pure Reason, and here he repeatedly emphasizes the importance of its critical project for the very existence of metaphysics as a science.